Pocsuite v2.0.8 – Remote Vulnerability Testing Framework Developed By The Knownsec Security Team

Pocsuite is an open-sourced remote vulnerability testing and proof-of-concept development framework developed by the Knownsec Security Team. It comes with a powerful proof-of-concept engine, many niche features for the ultimate penetration testers and security researchers.How to usePocsuite with seebug PoC search and zoomeye dorkPocsuite with seebug PoC and zoomeye dorkPocsuite with zoomeye APIPocsuite with seebug PoC API onlineRequirementsPython 2.6+Works on Linux, Windows, Mac OSX, BSDInstallationThe quick way:$ pip install pocsuiteOr click here to download the latest source zip package and extract$ wget https://github.com/knownsec/Pocsuite/archive/master.zip$ unzip master.zipThe latest version of this software is available from: http://pocsuite.orgDocumentationDocumentation is available in the english docs / chinese docs directory.LinksThanks ListChange LogBug trackingCopyrightPocsuiteSeebugZoomEyeDownload Pocsuite

Link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PentestTools/~3/a-xENGbQIj0/pocsuite-v208-remote-vulnerability.html

W3Brute – Automatic Web Application Brute Force Attack Tool

w3brute is an open source penetration testing tool that automates attacks directly to the website’s login page. w3brute is also supported for carrying out brute force attacks on all websites.FeaturesScanner:w3brute has a scanner feature that serves to support the bruteforce attack process. this is a list of available scanners:automatically detects target authentication type.admin page scanner.SQL injection scanner vulnerability.Attack Method:w3brute can attack using various methods of attack. this is a list of available attack methods:SQL injection bypass authenticationmixed credentials (username + SQL injection queries)Support:multiple target google dorking a list of supported web interface types to attack: web shellHTTP 401 UNAUTHORIZED (Basic and Digest)create file results brute force attack. supported file format type: CSV (default)HTMLSQLITE3custom credentials (username, password, domain) (supported zip file) custom HTTP requests (User-Agent, timeout, etc) and much more…InstallationYou can download the latest version of the tarball file here or zipball here. If you have installed the git package, you can clone the Git repository in a way, as below:git clone https://github.com/aprilahijriyan/w3brute.gitw3brute can be run with Python version 2.6.x or 2.7.x on all platforms.UsageTo get all list of options on w3brute tool:python w3brute.py -hExamples:# basic usage$ python w3brute.py -t http://www.example.com/admin/login.php# look for the admin page$ python w3brute.py -t http://www.example.com/ –admin# uses a password file zip list. (syntax => <;filename>[:password])$ python w3brute.py -t http://www.example.com/ –admin -u admin -p /path/to/file.zip;filename.txt # (if the file is encrypted: /path/to/file.zip;filename.txt:password)# slice the password from the list. (syntax => <start>[:stop][:step])$ python w3brute.py -t http://www.example.com/ –admin -u admin -sP 20000VideoLinksDownload: .tar.gz or .zipIssue tracker: https://github.com/aprilahijriyan/w3brute/issuesDownload W3Brute

Link: http://www.kitploit.com/2018/12/w3brute-automatic-web-application-brute.html

DevAudit – Open-source, Cross-Platform, Multi-Purpose Security Auditing Tool

DevAudit is an open-source, cross-platform, multi-purpose security auditing tool targeted at developers and teams adopting DevOps and DevSecOps that detects security vulnerabilities at multiple levels of the solution stack. DevAudit provides a wide array of auditing capabilities that automate security practices and implementation of security auditing in the software development life-cycle. DevAudit can scan your operating system and application package dependencies, application and application server configurations, and application code, for potential vulnerabilities based on data aggregated by providers like OSS Index and Vulners from a wide array of sources and data feeds such as the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) CVE data feed, the Debian Security Advisories data feed, Drupal Security Advisories, and many others.DevAudit helps developers address at least 4 of the OWASP Top 10 risks to web application development:A9 Using Components with Known VulnerabilitiesA5 Security MisconfigurationA6 Sensitive Data ExposureA2 Broken Authentication and Session Managementas well as risks classified by MITRE in the CWE dictionary such as CWE-2 Environment and CWE-200 Information Disclosure As development progresses and its capabilities mature, DevAudit will be able to address the other risks on the OWASP Top 10 and CWE lists like Injection and XSS. With the focus on web and cloud and distributed multi-user applications, software development today is increasingly a complex affair with security issues and potential vulnerabilities arising at all levels of the stack developers rely on to deliver applications. The goal of DevAudit is to provide a platform for automating implementation of development security reviews and best practices at all levels of the solution stack from library package dependencies to application and server configuration to source code.Features Cross-platform with a Docker image also available. DevAudit runs on Windows and Linux with *BSD and Mac and ARM Linux support planned. Only an up-to-date version of .NET or Mono is required to run DevAudit. A DevAudit Docker image can also be pulled from Docker Hub and run without the need to install Mono. CLI interface. DevAudit has a CLI interface with an option for non-interactive output and can be easily integrated into CI build pipelines or as post-build command-line tasks in developer IDEs. Work on integration of the core audit library into IDE GUIs has already begun with the Audit.Net Visual Studio extension. Continuously updated vulnerabilties data. DevAudit uses backend data providers like OSS Index and Vulners which provide continuously updated vulnerabilities data compiled from a wide range of security data feeds and sources such as the NVD CVE feeds, Drupal Security Advisories, and so on. Support for additional vulnerability and package data providers like vFeed and Libraries.io will be added. Audit operating system and development package dependencies. DevAudit audits Windows applications and packages installed via Windows MSI, Chocolatey, and OneGet, as well as Debian, Ubuntu, and CentOS Linux packages installed via Dpkg, RPM and YUM, for vulnerabilities reported for specific versions of the applications and packages. For development package dependencies and libraries DevAudit audits NuGet v2 dependencies for .NET, Yarn/NPM and Bower dependencies for nodejs, and Composer package dependencies for PHP. Support for other package managers for different languages is added regularly. Audit application server configurations. DevAudit audits the server version and the server configuration for the OpenSSH sshd, Apache httpd, MySQL/MariaDB, PostgreSQL, and Nginx servers with many more coming. Configuration auditing is based on the Alpheus library and is done using full syntactic analysis of the server configuration files. Server configuration rules are stored in YAML text files and can be customized to the needs of developers. Support for many more servers and applications and types of analysis like database auditing is added regularly. Audit application configurations. DevAudit audits Microsoft ASP.NET applications and detects vulnerabilities present in the application configuration. Application configuration rules are stored in YAML text files and can be customized to the needs of developers. Application configuration auditing for applications like Drupal and WordPress and DNN CMS is coming. Audit application code by static analysis. DevAudit currently supports static analysis of .NET CIL bytecode. Analyzers reside in external script files and can be fully customized based on the needs of the developer. Support for C# source code analysis via Roslyn, PHP7 source code and many more languages and external static code analysis tools is coming. Remote agentless auditing. DevAudit can connect to remote hosts via SSH with identical auditing features available in remote environments as in local environments. Only a valid SSH login is required to audit remote hosts and DevAudit running on Windows can connect to and audit Linux hosts over SSH. On Windows DevAudit can also remotely connect to and audit other Windows machines using WinRM. Agentless Docker container auditing. DevAudit can audit running Docker containers from the Docker host with identical features available in container environments as in local environments. GitHub repository auditing. DevAudit can connect directly to a project repository hosted on GitHub and perform package source and application configuration auditing. PowerShell support. DevAudit can also be run inside the PowerShell system administration environment as cmdlets. Work on PowerShell support is paused at present but will resume in the near future with support for cross-platform Powershell both on Windows and Linux. RequirementsDevAudit is a .NET 4.6 application. To install locally on your machine you will need either the Microsoft .NET Framework 4.6 runtime on Windows, or Mono 4.4+ on Linux. .NET 4.6 should be already installed on most recent versions of Windows, if not then it is available as a Windows feature that can be turned on or installed from the Programs and Features control panel applet on consumer Windows, or from the Add Roles and Features option in Server Manager on server versions of Windows. For older versions of Windows, the .NET 4.6 installer from Microsoft can be found here.On Linux the minimum version of Mono supported is 4.4. Although DevAudit runs on Mono 4 (with one known issue) it’s recommended that Mono 5 be installed. Mono 5 brings many improvements to the build and runtime components of Mono that benefit DevAudit.The existing Mono packages provided by your distro are probably not Mono 5 as yet, so you will have to install Mono packages manually to be able to use Mono 5. Installation instructions for the most recent packages provided by the Mono project for several major Linux distros are here. It is recommended you have the mono-devel package installed as this will reduce the chances of missing assemblies.Alternatively on Linux you can use the DevAudit Docker image if you do not wish to install Mono and already have Docker installed on your machine.InstallationDevAudit can be installed by the following methods:Building from source.Using a binary release archive file downloaded from Github for Windows or Linux.Using the release MSI installer downloaded from Github for Windows.Using the Chocolatey package manager on Windows.Pulling the ossindex/devaudit image from Docker Hub on Linux.Building from source on LinuxPre-requisites: Mono 4.4+ (Mono 5 recommended) and the mono-devel package which provides the compiler and other tools needed for building Mono apps. Your distro should have packages for at least Mono version 4.4 and above, otherwise manual installation instructions for the most recent packages provided by the Mono project for several major Linux distros are here Clone the DevAudit repository from https://github.com/OSSIndex/DevAudit.git Run the build.sh script in the root DevAudit directory. DevAudit should compile without any errors. Run ./devaudit –help and you should see the DevAudit version and help screen printed. Note that NuGet on Linux may occasionally exit with Error: NameResolutionFailure which seems to be a transient problem contacting the servers that contain the NuGet packages. You should just run ./build.sh again until the build completes normally.Building from source on WindowsPre-requisites: You must have one of: A .NET Framework 4.6 SDK or developer pack.Visual Studio 2015.Clone the DevAudit repository from https://github.com/OSSIndex/DevAudit.git From a visual Studio 2015 or ,NETRun the build.cmd script in the root DevAudit directory. DevAudit should compile without any errors. Run ./devaudit –help and you should see the DevAudit version and help screen printed. Installing from the release archive files on Windows on LinuxPre-requisites: You must have Mono 4.4+ on Linux or .NET 4.6 on Windows. Download the latest release archive file for Windows or Linux from the project releases page. Unpack this file to a directory. From the directory where you unpacked the release archive run devaudit –help on Windows or ./devaudit –help on Linux. You should see the version and help screen printed. (Optional) Add the DevAudit installation directory to your PATH environment variable Installing using the MSI Installer on WindowsThe MSI installer for a release can be found on the Github releases page.Click on the releases link near the top of the page.Identify the release you would like to install.A “DevAudit.exe" link should be visible for each release that has a pre-built installer.Download the file and execute the installer. You will be guided through a simple installation.Open a new command prompt or PowerShell window in order to have DevAudit in path.Run DevAudit.Installing using Chocolatey on WindowsDevAudit is also available on Chocolatey.Install Chocolatey.Open an admin console or PowerShell window.Type choco install devauditRun DevAudit.Installing using Docker on LinuxPull the Devaudit image from Docker Hub: docker pull ossindex/devaudit. The image tagged ossindex/devaudit:latest (which is the default image that is downloaded) is built from the most recent release while ossindex/devaudit:unstable is built on the master branch of the source code and contains the newest additions albeit with less testing.ConceptsAudit TargetRepresents a logical group of auditing functions. DevAudit currently supports the following audit targets:Package Source. A package source manages application and library dependencies using a package manager. Package managers install, remove or update applications and library dependencies for an operating system like Debian Linux, or for a development language or framework like .NET or nodejs. Examples of package sources are dpkg, yum, Chocolatey, Composer, and Bower. DevAudit audits the names and versions of installed packages against vulnerabilities reported for specific versions of those packages.Application. An application like Drupal or a custom application built using a framework like ASP.NET. DevAudit audits applications and application modules and plugins against vulnerabilities reported for specific versions of application binaries and modules and plugins. DevAudit can also audit application configurations for known vulnerabilities, and perform static analysis on application code looking for known weaknesses.Application Server. Application servers provide continuously running services or daemons like a web or database server for other applications to use, or for users to access services like authentication. Examples of application servers are the OpenSSH sshd and Apache httpd servers. DevAudit can audit application server binaries, modules and plugins against vulnerabilities reported for specific versions as well as audit server configurations for known server configuration vulnerabilities and weaknesses.Audit EnvironmentRepresents a logical environment where audits against audit targets are executed. Audit environments abstract the I/O and command executions required for an audit and allow identical functions to be performed against audit targets on whatever physical or network location the target’s files and executables are located. The follwing environments are currently supported :Local. This is the default audit environment where audits are executed on the local machine.SSH. Audits are executed on a remote host connected over SSH. It is not necessary to have DevAudit installed on the remote host.WinRM. Audits are executed on a remote Windows host connected over WinRM. It is not necessary to have DevAudit installed on the remote host.Docker. Audits are executed on a running Docker container. It is not necessary to have DevAudit installed on the container image.GitHub. Audits are executed on a GitHub project repository’s file-system directly. It is not necessary to checkout or download the project locally to perform the audit.Audit OptionsThese are different options that can be enabled for the audit. You can specify options that apply to the DevAudit program for example, to run in non-interactive mode, as well as options that apply to the target e.g if you set the AppDevMode option for auditing ASP.NET applications to true then certain audit rules will not be enabled.Basic UsageThe CLI is the primary interface to the DevAudit program and is suitable both for interactive use and for non-interactive use in scheduled tasks, shell scripts, CI build pipelines and post-build tasks in developer IDEs. The basic DevAudit CLI syntax is:devaudit TARGET [ENVIRONMENT] | [OPTIONS]where TARGET specifies the audit target ENVIRONMENT specifies the audit environment and OPTIONS specifies the options for the audit target and environment. There are 2 ways to specify options: program options and general audit options that apply to more than one target can be specified directly on the command-line as parameters . Target-specific options can be specified with the -o options using the format: -o OPTION1=VALUE1,OPTION2=VALUE2,…. with commas delimiting each option key-value pair.If you are piping or redirecting the program output to a file then you should always use the -n –non-interactive option to disable any interactive user interface features and animations.When specifying file paths, an @ prefix before a path indicates to DevAudit that this path is relative to the root directory of the audit target e.g if you specify: -r c:\myproject -b @bin\Debug\app2.exe DevAudit considers the path to the binary file as c:\myproject\bin\Debug\app2.exe.Audit TargetsPackage Sources msi Do a package audit of the Windows Installer MSI package source on Windows machines. choco Do a package audit of packages installed by the Choco package manager. oneget Do a package audit of the system OneGet package source on Windows. nuget Do a package audit of a NuGet v2 package source. You must specify the location of the NuGet packages.config file you wish to audit using the -f or –file option otherwise the current directory will be searched for this file. bower Do a package audit of a Bower package source. You must specify the location of the Bower packages.json file you wish to audit using the -f or –file option otherwise the current directory will be searched for this file. composer Do a package audit of a Composer package source. You must specify the location of the Composer composer.json file you wish to audit using the -f or –file option otherwise the current directory will be searched for this file. dpkg Do a package audit of the system dpkg package source on Debian Linux and derivatives. rpm Do a package audit of the system RPM package source on RedHat Linux and derivatives. yum Do a package audit of the system Yum package source on RedHat Linux and derivatives. For every package source the following general audit options can be used: -f –file Specify the location of the package manager configuration file if needed. The NuGet, Bower and Composer package sources require this option. –list-packages Only list the packages in the package source scanned by DevAudit. –list-artifacts Only list the artifacts found on OSS Index for packages scanned by DevAudit. Package sources tagged [Experimental] are only available in the master branch of the source code and may have limited back-end OSS Index support. However you can always list the packages scanned and artifacts available on OSS Index using the list-packages and list-artifacts options.Applications aspnet Do an application audit on a ASP.NET application. The relevant options are: -r –root-directory Specify the root directory of the application. This is just the top-level application directory that contains files like Global.asax and Web.config.-b –application-binary Specify the application binary. The is the .NET assembly that contains the application’s .NET bytecode. This file is usually a .DLL and located in the bin sub-folder of the ASP.NET application root directory.-c –configuration-file or -o AppConfig=configuration-file Specifies the ASP.NET application configuration file. This file is usually named Web.config and located in the application root directory. You can override the default @Web.config value with this option.-o AppDevMode=enabled Specifies that application development mode should be enabled for the audit. This mode can be used when auditing an application that is under development. Certain configuration rules that are tagged as disabled for AppDevMode (e.g running the application in ASP.NET debug mode) will not be enabled during the audit. netfx Do an application audit on a .NET application. The relevant options are: -r –root-directory Specify the root directory of the application. This is just the top-level application directory that contains files like App.config.-b –application-binary Specify the application binary. The is the .NET assembly that contains the application’s .NET bytecode. This file is usually a .DLL and located in the bin sub-folder of the ASP.NET application root directory.-c –configuration-file or -o AppConfig=configuration-file Specifies the .NET application configuration file. This file is usually named App.config and located in the application root directory. You can override the default @App.config value with this option.-o GendarmeRules=RuleLibrary Specifies that the Gendarme static analyzer should enabled for the audit with rules from the specified rules library used. For example: devaudit netfx -r /home/allisterb/vbot-debian/vbot.core -b @bin/Debug/vbot.core.dll –skip-packages-audit -o GendarmeRules=Gendarme.Rules.Naming will run the Gendarme static analyzer on the vbot.core.dll assembly using rules from Gendarme.Rules.Naming library. The complete list of rules libraries is (taken from the Gendarme wiki):Gendarme.Rules.BadPracticeGendarme.Rules.ConcurrencyGendarme.Rules.CorrectnessGendarme.Rules.DesignGendarme.Rules.Design.GenericGendarme.Rules.Design.LinqGendarme.Rules.ExceptionsGendarme.Rules.GendarmeGendarme.Rules.GlobalizationGendarme.Rules.InteroperabilityGendarme.Rules.Interoperability.ComGendarme.Rules.MaintainabilityGendarme.Rules.NUnitGendarme.Rules.NamingGendarme.Rules.PerformanceGendarme.Rules.PortabilityGendarme.Rules.SecurityGendarme.Rules.Security.CasGendarme.Rules.SerializationGendarme.Rules.SmellsGendarme.Rules.Ui drupal7 Do an application audit on a Drupal 7 application. -r –root-directory Specify the root directory of the application. This is just the top-level directory of your Drupal 7 install. drupal8 Do an application audit on a Drupal 8 application. -r –root-directory Specify the root directory of the application. This is just the top-level directory of your Drupal 8 install.All applications also support the following common options for auditing the application modules or plugins: –list-packages Only list the application plugins or modules scanned by DevAudit. –list-artifacts Only list the artifacts found on OSS Index for application plugins and modules scanned by DevAudit. –skip-packages-audit Only do an appplication configuration or code analysis audit and skip the packages audit. Application Servers sshd Do an application server audit on an OpenSSH sshd-compatible server. httpd Do an application server audit on an Apache httpd-compatible server. mysql Do an application server audit on a MySQL-compatible server (like MariaDB or Oracle MySQL.) nginx Do an application server audit on a Nginx server. pgsql Do an application server audit on a PostgreSQL server. This is an example command line for an application server audit: ./devaudit httpd -i httpd-2.2 -r /usr/local/apache2/ -c @conf/httpd.conf -b @bin/httpd which audits an Apache Httpd server running on a Docker container named httpd-2.2.The following are audit options common to all application servers:-r –root-directory Specifies the root directory of the server. This is just the top-level of your server filesystem and defaults to / unless you want a different server root.-c –configuration-file Specifies the server configuration file. e.g in the above audit the Apache configuration file is located at /usr/local/apache2/conf/httpd.conf. If you don’t specify the configuration file DevAudit will attempt to auto-detect the configuration file for the server selected.-b –application-binary Specifies the server binary. e.g in the above audit the Apache binary is located at /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd. If you don’t specify the binary path DevAudit will attempt to auto-detect the server binary for the server selected.Application servers also support the following common options for auditing the server modules or plugins: –list-packages Only list the application plugins or modules scanned by DevAudit. –list-artifacts Only list the artifacts found on OSS Index for application plugins and modules scanned by DevAudit. –skip-packages-audit Only do a server configuration audit and skip the packages audit. EnvironmentsThere are currently 5 audit environment supported: local, remote hosts over SSH, remote hosts over WinRM, Docker containers, and GitHub. Local environments are used by default when no other environment options are specified.SSHThe SSH environment allows audits to be performed on any remote hosts accessible over SSH without requiring DevAudit to be installed on the remote host. SSH environments are cross-platform: you can connect to a Linux remote host from a Windows machine running DevAudit. An SSH environment is created by the following options:-s SERVER [–ssh-port PORT] -u USER [-k KEYFILE] [-p | –password-text PASSWORD]-s SERVER Specifies the remote host or IP to connect to via SSH.-u USER Specifies the user to login to the server with.–ssh-port PORT Specifies the port on the remote host to connect to. The default is 22.-k KEYFILE Specifies the OpenSSH compatible private key file to use to connect to the remote server. Currently only RSA or DSA keys in files in the PEM format are supported.-p Provide a prompt with local echo disabled for interactive entry of the server password or key file passphrase.–password-text PASSWORD Specify the user password or key file passphrase as plaintext on the command-line. Note that on Linux when your password contains special characters you should use enclose the text on the command-line using single-quotes like ‘MyPa

Link: http://www.kitploit.com/2018/12/devaudit-open-source-cross-platform.html

LightBulb Framework – Tools For Auditing WAFS

LightBulb is an open source python framework for auditing web application firewalls and filters.SynopsisThe framework consists of two main algorithms: GOFA: An active learning algorithm that infers symbolic representations of automata in the standard membership/equivalence query model.Active learning algorithms permits the analysis of filter and sanitizer programs remotely, i.e. given only the ability to query the targeted program and observe the output. SFADiff: A black-box differential testing algorithm based on Symbolic Finite Automata (SFA) learningFinding differences between programs with similar functionality is an important security problem as such differences can be used for fingerprinting or creating evasion attacks against security software like Web Application Firewalls (WAFs) which are designed to detect malicious inputs to web applications.MotivationWeb Applications Firewalls (WAFs) are fundamental building blocks of modern application security. For example, the PCI standard for organizations handling credit card transactions dictates that any application facing the internet should be either protected by a WAF or successfully pass a code review process. Nevertheless, despite their popularity and importance, auditing web application firewalls remains a challenging and complex task. Finding attacks that bypass the firewall usually requires expert domain knowledge for a specific vulnerability class. Thus, penetration testers not armed with this knowledge are left with publicly available lists of attack strings, like the XSS Cheat Sheet, which are usually insufficient for thoroughly evaluating the security of a WAF product.Commands UsageMain interface commands: Command Description core Shows available core modules utils Shows available query handlers info Prints module information library Enters library modules Shows available application modules use <module> Enters module start <moduleA> <moduleB> Initiate algorithm help Prints help status Checks and installs required packages complete Prints bash completion command Module commands: Command Description back Go back to main menu info Prints current module information library Enters library options Shows available options define <option> <value> Set an option value start Initiate algoritm complete Prints bash completion command Library commands: Command Description back Go back to main menu info <folder\module> Prints requested module information (folder must be located in lightbulb/data/) cat <folder\module> Prints requested module (folder must be located in lightbulb/data/) modules <folder> Shows available library modules in the requested folder (folder must be located in lightbulb/data/) search <keywords> Searches available library modules using comma separated keywords complete Prints bash completion command InstallationPrepare your systemFirst you have to verify that your system supports flex, python dev, pip and build utilities:For apt platforms (ubuntu, debian…): sudo apt-get install flex sudo apt-get install python-pip sudo apt-get install python-dev sudo apt-get install build-essential(Optional for apt) If you want to add support for MySQL testing: sudo apt-get install libmysqlclient-devFor yum platforms (centos, redhat, fedora…) with already installed the extra packages repo (epel-release): sudo yum install -y python-pip sudo yum install -y python-devel sudo yum install -y wget sudo yum groupinstall -y ‘Development Tools'(Optional for yum) If you want to add support for MySQL testing: sudo yum install -y mysql-devel sudo yum install -y MySQL-pythonInstall LightbulbIn order to use the application without complete package installation:git clone https://github.com/lightbulb-framework/lightbulb-frameworkcd lightbulb-frameworkmakelightbulb statusIn order to perform complete package installation. You can also install it from pip repository. This requires first to install the latest setuptools version:pip install setuptools –upgradepip install lightbulb-frameworklightbulb statusIf you want to use virtualenv:pip install virtualenvvirtualenv envsource env/bin/activatepip install lightbulb-frameworklightbulb statusThe “lightbulb status" command will guide you to install MySQLdb and OpenFst support. If you use virtualenv in linux, the "sudo" command will be required only for the installation of libmysqlclient-dev package.It should be noted that the "lightbulb status" command is not necessary if you are going to use the Burp Extension. The reason is that this command installs the "openfst" and "mysql" bindings and the extension by default is using Jython, which does not support C bindings. It is recommended to use the command only if you want to change the Burp extension configuration from the settings and enable the native support.It is also possible to use a docker instance:docker pull lightbulb/lightbulb-frameworkInstall Burp ExtensionIf you wish to use the new GUI, you can use the extension for the Burp Suite. First you have to setup a working environment with Burp Proxy and JythonDownload the latest Jython from hereFind your local python packages installation folder*Configure Burp Extender to use these values, as shown below*Select the new LightBulb module ("BurpExtension.py") and set the extension type to be "Python"*You can ignore this step, and install the standalone version which contains all the required python packages included. You can download it hereExamplesCheck out the Wiki page for usage examples.ContributorsGeorge ArgyrosIoannis StaisSuman JanaAngelos D. KeromytisAggelos KiayiasReferencesG. Argyros, I. Stais, S. Jana, A. D. Keromytis, and A. Kiayias. 2016. SFADiff: Automated Evasion Attacks and Fingerprinting Using Black-box Differential Automata Learning. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS ’16). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1690-1701. doi: 10.1145/2976749.2978383G. Argyros, I. Stais, A. Kiayias and A. D. Keromytis, "Back in Black: Towards Formal, Black Box Analysis of Sanitizers and Filters," 2016 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP), San Jose, CA, 2016, pp. 91-109. doi: 10.1109/SP.2016.14Download Lightbulb-Framework

Link: http://www.kitploit.com/2018/12/lightbulb-framework-tools-for-auditing.html