How Our Threat Analytics Multi-Region Data Lake on AWS Stores More, Slashes Costs

Data is the lifeblood of digital businesses, and a key competitive advantage. The question is: how can you store your data cost-efficiently, access it quickly, while abiding by privacy laws? At Imperva, we wanted to store our data for long-term access. Databases would’ve cost too much in disk and memory, especially since we didn’t know […]
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Imperva Makes Major Expansion in Application Security

When Imperva announced in 2018 it would acquire the application security solution provider Prevoty, a company I co-founded with Julien Bellanger, I knew it would be a win-win for our industry. Prevoty’s flagship product, Autonomous Application Protection, is the most mature, market-tested runtime application self-protection (RASP) solution (as proof, Prevoty was just named a Silver […]
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Ixia, Yubico, Fortinet, and ZeroStack – Enterprise Security Weekly #118

Ixia extends collaboration with ProtectWise, Ping Identity brings in New Customer Identity as a service solution, Fortinet introduces new security automation capabilities on AWS, and Yubico announces YubiHSM 2 integration with AWS IoT Greengrass! Enterprise News Ixia extends collaboration with ProtectWise – Ixia´s Vision ONE network packet broker and the CloudLens visibility platform, combined with The ProtectWise […]
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AWS EC2 instance userData

In the effort to get me blogging again I’ll be doing a few short posts to get the juices flowing (hopefully).Today I learned about the userData instance attribute for AWS EC2. https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ec2-instance-metadata.htmlIn general I thought metadata was only things you can hit from WITHIN the instance via the metadata url: http://169.254.169.254/latest/meta-data/However, if you read the link above there is an option to add metadata at boot time. You can also use instance metadata to access user data that you specified when launching your instance. For example, you can specify parameters for configuring your instance, or attach a simple script. That’s interesting right?!?!  so if you have some AWS creds the easiest way to check for this (after you enumerate instance IDs) is with the aws cli.$ aws ec2 describe-instance-attribute –attribute userData –instance-id i-0XXXXXXXXAn error occurred (InvalidInstanceID.NotFound) when calling the DescribeInstanceAttribute operation: The instance ID ‘i-0XXXXXXXX’ does not existah crap, you need the region…$ aws ec2 describe-instance-attribute –attribute userData –instance-id i-0XXXXXXXX –region us-west-1{    “InstanceId": "i-0XXXXXXXX",    "UserData": {        "Value": "bm90IHRvZGF5IElTSVMgOi0p"}anyway that can get tedious especially if the org has a ton of things running.  This is precisely the reason @cktricky and I built weirdAAL.  Surely no one would be sticking creds into things at boot time via shell scripts :-)That module is in the current version of weirdAAL. Enjoy.-CG

Link: http://carnal0wnage.attackresearch.com/2018/11/aws-ec2-instance-userdata.html

Imperva Integration With AWS Security Hub: Expanding Customer Security Visibility

This article explains how Imperva application security integrates with AWS Security Hub to give customers better visibility and feedback on the security status of their AWS hosted applications. Securing AWS Applications Cost reduction, simplified operations, and other benefits are driving organizations to move more and more applications onto AWS delivery platforms; because all of the […]
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Pacu – The AWS Exploitation Framework, Designed For Testing The Security Of Amazon Web Services Environments

Pacu is an open source AWS exploitation framework, designed for offensive security testing against cloud environments. Created and maintained by Rhino Security Labs, Pacu allows penetration testers to exploit configuration flaws within an AWS account, using modules to easily expand its functionality. Current modules enable a range of attacks, including user privilege escalation, backdooring of IAM users, attacking vulnerable Lambda functions, and much more.InstallationPacu is a fairly lightweight program, as it requires only Python3.5+ and pip3 to install a handful of Python libraries. Running install.sh will check your Python version and ensure all Python packages are up to date.Quick Installation > git clone https://github.com/RhinoSecurityLabs/pacu > cd pacu > bash install.sh > python3 pacu.pyFor a more detailed and user-friendly set of user instructions, please check out the Wiki’s installation guide.Pacu’s Modular PowerPacu uses a range of plug-in modules to assist an attacker in enumeration, privilege escalation, data exfiltration, service exploitation, and log manipulation within AWS environments. At present, Pacu has 36 modules for executing AWS attacks, but we’ll be working hard to add more modules in the future, and suggestions for new modules (or even contributions of whole completed modules) are welcome.In order to keep pace with ongoing AWS product developments, we’ve designed Pacu from the ground up with extensibility in mind. A common syntax and data structure keeps modules easy to build and expand on – no need to specify AWS regions or make redundant permission checks between modules. A local SQLite database is used to manage and manipulate retrieved data, minimizing API calls (and associated logs). Reporting and attack auditing is also built into the framework; Pacu assists the documentation process through command logging and exporting, helping build a timeline for the testing process.We’ll be working on improve Pacu’s core capabilities and building out a well-documented ecosystem so that cybersecurity researchers and developers can make new modules quickly and easily.CommunityWe’re always happy to get bugs reports in the Pacu framework itself, as well as testing and feedback on different modules, and generally critical feedback to help refine the framework. We hope to see this grow into a key open-source tool for testing AWS security, and we need your help to make that happen! Any support towards this effort through use, testing, improvement, or just by spreading the word, would be very much appreciated.If you’re interested in contributing directly to the Pacu Framework itself, please read our contribution guidelines for code conventions and git flow notes.Developing Pacu ModulesIf you’re interested in writing your own modules for Pacu, check out our Module Development wiki page. As you develop new capabilities please reach out to us — we’d love to add your new modules into the core collection that comes with Pacu.Pacu Framework Development GoalsImprove interface formattingDatabase forward-migrations and version tracking”Attack Playbooks" to allow for easier use of complex module execution chainsColored console outputModule Dry-Run functionalityAllow use of standalone config filesPlugin architecture improvementsNotesPacu is officially supported in OSX and Linux.Pacu is Open-Source Software, and is distributed with a BSD-3-Clause License.Getting StartedThe first time Pacu is launched, you will be prompted to start and name a new session. This session will be used to store AWS key pairs, as well as any data obtained from running various modules. You can have any number of different sessions in Pacu, each with their own sets of AWS keys and data, and resume a session at any time (though a restart is currently required to switch between sessions).Modules require an AWS key, which grant you minimal access to an AWS environment and are comprised of an access key ID and a secret access key. To set your session’s keys, use the set_keys command, and then follow the prompts to supply a key alias (nickname for reference), an AWS access key ID, an AWS secret access key, and an AWS session token (if you are using one).If you are ever stuck, help will bring up a list of commands that are available.Basic Commands in Paculist will list the available modules for the regions that were set in the current session.help module_name will return the applicable help information for the specified module.run module_name will run the specified module with its default parameters.run module_name –regions eu-west-1,us-west-1 will run the specified module against the eu-west-1 and us-west-1 regions (for modules that support the –regions argument)Submitting Requests / Bug ReportsReport vulnerabilities in Pacu directly to us via email: .Pacu creates error logs within each session’s folder, as well as a global error log for out-of-session errors which is created in the main directory. If you can, please include these logs with your bug reports, as it will dramatically simplify the debugging process.If you have a feature request, an idea, or a bug to report, please submit them here.Please include a description sufficient to reproduce the bug you found, including tracebacks and reproduction steps, and check for other reports of your bug before filing a new bug report. Don’t submit duplicates.WikiFor walkthroughs and full documentation, please visit the Pacu wiki.Contact UsWe’d love to hear from you, whatever the reason. Shoot us an email at anytime!Disclaimers, and the AWS Acceptable Use PolicyTo the best of our knowledge Pacu’s capabilities are compliant with the AWS Acceptable Use Policy, but as a flexible and modular tool we cannot guarantee this will be true in every situation. It is entirely your responsibility to ensure that how you use Pacu is compliant with the AWS Acceptable Use Policy.Depending on what AWS services you use and what your planned testing entails, you may need to request authorization from Amazon prior to actually running Pacu against your infrastructure. Determining whether or not such authorization is necessary is your responsibility.As with any penetration testing tool, it is your responsibility to get proper authorization before using Pacu outside of your own environment.Pacu is software that comes with absolutely no warranties whatsoever. By using Pacu, you take full responsibility for any and all outcomes that result.Download Pacu

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Imperva and Amazon Partner to Help Mitigate Risks Associated With Cloud Migration

Helping our customers reduce the risks associated with migrating to the cloud, and preventing availability and security incidents, has been a major development focus for Imperva over the last several years.   Why the partnership matters Although cloud service providers take a host of IT management burdens off of your shoulders when using their platforms, […]
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AWS Lambda, Bleedingbit, and Cisco – Paul’s Security Weekly #581

AWS Security Best Practices, Masscan and massive address lists, Bleedingbit vulnerabilities, and Cisco Zero-Day exploited in the wild, ! All that and more, on this episode of Paul’s Security Weekly! Paul’s Stories Web Security Stats Show XSS & Outdated Software Are Major Problems AWS Security Best Practices: AWS Lambda Security Design for Failure Employee used […]
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